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Matt

Possible new fish

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Hi,

I have a 55 gallon malawi tank (new pictures in new photo album) with many large rocks and about 650 gallons of flow an hour. Filters include a emperor 400 and a fluval 304. I also have a wisper power head to keep the poop off the sand substrate. i have changed all the rocks and layout of the tank recently and want to know what other fish i could add to my group if any at all.

 

my current fish include:

 

Pseudotropheus estherae x2

P. elongatus x2

P. flavus x1

Labidichromis carelues x2

Christmas fulu x2

 

I was thinkg of adding mabe 2 more fish possibly a pseudotropheus zebar B&B male and a pseudotropheus acei male. Tell me what you think and what other fish i could possibly add. Thank You

MAtt

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As I said in my other post about this topic, I think you desperately need more females before you add anything else. Mbuna are well know harem breeders and keeping pairs of these fish puts the female in risk that often ends in her being stressed or attacked to death by the male.

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I was think of going with a tank with no to very few females since aggression only occurs during breeding times and there is only aggression between the same species. So eventually i think i will end up with all males of different species. tell me what you think.

 

And btw pseudotropheus flavus females are grey.

MAtt

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If you want to try a one sex tank, thats up to you but having only one female per male is putting a lot of aggression on those females. Females have very little room to escape from males in a tank and their best bet is to have several for the male to spread his aggression over.

 

If you are going to try a one sex tank, you'd be more likely to have sucess with an all ladies tank. With mbuna its pretty easy to get a really colorful tank out of all females. They are naturally less aggressive and you're less likely to have problems than if you have males. If you want to do all males, I would pull out your females now though.

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I think i am just going to keep what i have now. but thanks for all the comments. i have one more question; does more fish mean less aggression? if so how many fish would you add to a 55 gallon tank to lower aggression. btw you can view an updated picture of this tank in the new photo album. please look at my pictures and add comments. thank you

MAtt

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Hi Matt...

 

to start...a one sex mbuna tank is NOT the way to go. Either male of female. It just doesn't work with mbuna due to the aggression. When it comes to mbuna I don't even worry about what the sex of my fish is.

 

I have a 75gallon that is haps and mbuna mixed, and it is very colorful with just 2 species of mbuna and a bunch of silver juvi haps. Yellow Labs and Ps Acei are a great combo and would make a pretty nice addition to your tank.

 

I think that you are trying to achieve an all male tank because you have read about people doing this with Haps and Peacocks...that is fine, because their aggression is pretty low, it doesn't work that way with mbuna.

 

Overcrowding a tank works because the chaser can easily lose a chaseeee. Lots of rock work can help in that situation as well...

 

Jeff

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A properly overcrowded 55g would be like 17 mbuna. Mbuna are generally the only Africans people overcrowd with, other species are said not to respond to overcrowding well.

 

But if you add more fish to the ones you already have, you should rearrange all the decor before you add them. All your fish are likely to gang up on the new fish. If you add more, its also better to add them in groups rather than one at a time so that the aggression is spread out over all the new fish instead of just one fish being targeted.

 

Adding more rockwork in ways that creates more territory works really well to cut down on aggression with pretty much any territorial fish. I just added more plants to my Betta community so that they would stop tearing each other apart and it worked almost instantly.

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I find that rock work only works best if it has the ability to divide up sections. If a mbuna has the ability to see all the way across the 4ft length of your tank it is going to be bad. Mbuna usually don't like to be able to see any fish of their own species, more on the male side than the female side. I also find that it helps to bring down the length of a chase. If a Mbuna has a lot of turns to make to get away, more than likely the chaser is going to get lost along the way.

 

Right now I have a Red Finned Borlyi chasing around all the haps in my tank. I may need to figure out how to stop this before it gets bad.

 

Jeff

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